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productivE landSCAPE - bay diagrams(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - bay diagrams
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - site diagrams(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - site diagrams
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - plans - upper level roof and lower level(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - plans - upper level roof and lower level
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - everyday vs. catastrophic event
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE (marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE (Tsukiji Market Studio)
marlo and phillippine

Siphon Sponge (ML studio)

In the midst of heavy rain seasons the impermeable surfaces of Tokyo are subject to high risk flooding. The infrastructural intervention of Siphon Sponge integrates the Tsukiji fish market and tourist attractions while providing new, infrastructural improvements of siphoning water from the bay and storm water run-off of the city.  Projects such as G-CANS, on the outskirts of Tokyo, and the centrally located Siphon Sponge, adjacent to the Sumida River, remediate such ecological risks. 

Connecting with the city’s underground drainage system on one side and a lower point in the river on the other side the building is able to use the siphon effect to draw city rain water into the building.  A series of siphon, ‘bladder networks’ intermingle throughout the thick walls of the building dipping into the surfaces of the spaces outside and within the structure, expanding and contracting to effect the adjacent market spaces. A series of craters on the surface and on the interior of the building act as collection ponds to store heavy rains before releasing them into the local water system. 

The exterior is made of a low slope and strong cliff-like forms to create obvious entrance points where public access is granted. A public, historical park nearby is therefore extended along the river; decreasing the absence of public green space in Tokyo.  Additional limited daytime hours of the park and the boat tours that launch from the water edge can be extended with its connection to Siphon Sponge.

Siphon Sponge - concept model (craters and valleys

Siphon Sponge - concept model (craters and valleys

Siphon Sponge - interior view of wholesale market. 

Siphon Sponge - interior view of wholesale market. 

Siphon Sponge - Jon and John

Siphon Sponge (manufactured landscapes studio)

Jon and John

unzipping the coast diagrams

unzipping the coast diagrams

[UN] zipping the Coast

Tokyo is famous for being one of the largest metropolitan areas and one of the most densely populated cities in the world. The city’s urban composition is mostly conformed of tight spaces, small streets and reduced public space due to rapid population growth and poor urban planning.

Tsukiji Market is one of Tokyo’s main public spaces and it’s the most well-known wholesale fish market in the world. This market is a complex physical, cultural and laborious environment, which cannot be understood apart from its placement. This construction of place connects the social structure to a meaning of identity and tradition carried out by the Japanese people and its processes.

Tsukiji Market forms part of Tokyo Bay’s waterfront area, but being at the water edge brings many possibilities as well as many disadvantages. Tsukiji Market has to deal with high flood risk due to sea level rise caused by storm surges and global warming. Also, the waters of Tokyo Bay suffer from Hypoxia, a lack of oxygen, due to high pollution caused by land reclamation on the bay. Taking this research as a backdrop, Tsukiji Market renders many opportunities for much needed productive open public space? for city life at large.

 Our infrastructural intervention strives to embed the market in its place and provide temporary relief against flood hazard while still attending ecological issues in Tokyo Bay, with the purpose of restoring and creating new ecosystems and providing safety measures for urban life at water edge.

To rectify the bay as a thriving ecosystem, hydraulic structures were designed to treat the Tokyo Bay water. The zipper-shaped labyrinth weir is a hydraulic structure that works as a barrier designed to alter the flow characteristics of water using a trapezoidal shape to oxygenate the water as it moves through the weir. By aerating the water, this infrastructure could provide sufficient oxygen to start restoring marine life in Tokyo Bay. This design strategy became a way of envisioning an intervention that would attend to the agendas of the site in a passive way.

This ecological infrastructure is designed as a system formed by vast concrete structures, which inject themselves 50 meters deep into the ground and use the market as a catalyst for a larger coastal intervention that invades other water edges. By attaching itself to other sites it starts creating a buffer that offsets the water edge further back with the purpose of protecting city life for future water level rise. The zigzagging behavior of the infrastructure provides numerous possibilities of canals, lagoons, wetlands and aeration areas for the treatment of Tokyo Bay’s water and the growth of small ecosystems. Water tanks, spillways and wetlands are used for water management and for the temporarily relief of flooding that may occur around the coast.

The new market is re-envisioned as an infrastructural system that links multiple components together to form a larger strategy for the market and sites beyond. Every component is connects the wholesale area, storage and auction vertically. The outer Market (retail and shops) now spreads throughout the infrastructure like an exterior market bazaar that lets public life permeate throughout the site.

Tsukiji Market would evolve into a new manufactured landscape for the city that will combat ecological realities and offer new possibilities for productive public space.

Melissa Burgos and Pauline Vivaldi - 

Larsen Tokyo Studio Spring 2012

Unzipping the Coast - The new market is re-envisioned as an infrastructural system that links multiple components together to form a larger strategy for the market and sites beyond. Every component is connects the wholesale area, storage and auction vertically. The outer Market (retail and shops) now spreads throughout the infrastructure like an exterior market bazaar that lets public life permeate throughout the site.
MB + PV

Unzipping the Coast - The new market is re-envisioned as an infrastructural system that links multiple components together to form a larger strategy for the market and sites beyond. Every component is connects the wholesale area, storage and auction vertically. The outer Market (retail and shops) now spreads throughout the infrastructure like an exterior market bazaar that lets public life permeate throughout the site.

MB + PV

productivE landSCAPE - bay diagrams(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - bay diagrams
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - site diagrams(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - site diagrams
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - plans - upper level roof and lower level(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - plans - upper level roof and lower level
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE - everyday vs. catastrophic event
(marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE (marlo and philippine)

productivE landSCAPE (Tsukiji Market Studio)
marlo and phillippine

Siphon Sponge (ML studio)

In the midst of heavy rain seasons the impermeable surfaces of Tokyo are subject to high risk flooding. The infrastructural intervention of Siphon Sponge integrates the Tsukiji fish market and tourist attractions while providing new, infrastructural improvements of siphoning water from the bay and storm water run-off of the city.  Projects such as G-CANS, on the outskirts of Tokyo, and the centrally located Siphon Sponge, adjacent to the Sumida River, remediate such ecological risks. 

Connecting with the city’s underground drainage system on one side and a lower point in the river on the other side the building is able to use the siphon effect to draw city rain water into the building.  A series of siphon, ‘bladder networks’ intermingle throughout the thick walls of the building dipping into the surfaces of the spaces outside and within the structure, expanding and contracting to effect the adjacent market spaces. A series of craters on the surface and on the interior of the building act as collection ponds to store heavy rains before releasing them into the local water system. 

The exterior is made of a low slope and strong cliff-like forms to create obvious entrance points where public access is granted. A public, historical park nearby is therefore extended along the river; decreasing the absence of public green space in Tokyo.  Additional limited daytime hours of the park and the boat tours that launch from the water edge can be extended with its connection to Siphon Sponge.

Siphon Sponge - concept model (craters and valleys

Siphon Sponge - concept model (craters and valleys

Siphon Sponge - interior view of wholesale market. 

Siphon Sponge - interior view of wholesale market. 

Siphon Sponge - Jon and John

Siphon Sponge (manufactured landscapes studio)

Jon and John

unzipping the coast diagrams

unzipping the coast diagrams

[UN] zipping the Coast

Tokyo is famous for being one of the largest metropolitan areas and one of the most densely populated cities in the world. The city’s urban composition is mostly conformed of tight spaces, small streets and reduced public space due to rapid population growth and poor urban planning.

Tsukiji Market is one of Tokyo’s main public spaces and it’s the most well-known wholesale fish market in the world. This market is a complex physical, cultural and laborious environment, which cannot be understood apart from its placement. This construction of place connects the social structure to a meaning of identity and tradition carried out by the Japanese people and its processes.

Tsukiji Market forms part of Tokyo Bay’s waterfront area, but being at the water edge brings many possibilities as well as many disadvantages. Tsukiji Market has to deal with high flood risk due to sea level rise caused by storm surges and global warming. Also, the waters of Tokyo Bay suffer from Hypoxia, a lack of oxygen, due to high pollution caused by land reclamation on the bay. Taking this research as a backdrop, Tsukiji Market renders many opportunities for much needed productive open public space? for city life at large.

 Our infrastructural intervention strives to embed the market in its place and provide temporary relief against flood hazard while still attending ecological issues in Tokyo Bay, with the purpose of restoring and creating new ecosystems and providing safety measures for urban life at water edge.

To rectify the bay as a thriving ecosystem, hydraulic structures were designed to treat the Tokyo Bay water. The zipper-shaped labyrinth weir is a hydraulic structure that works as a barrier designed to alter the flow characteristics of water using a trapezoidal shape to oxygenate the water as it moves through the weir. By aerating the water, this infrastructure could provide sufficient oxygen to start restoring marine life in Tokyo Bay. This design strategy became a way of envisioning an intervention that would attend to the agendas of the site in a passive way.

This ecological infrastructure is designed as a system formed by vast concrete structures, which inject themselves 50 meters deep into the ground and use the market as a catalyst for a larger coastal intervention that invades other water edges. By attaching itself to other sites it starts creating a buffer that offsets the water edge further back with the purpose of protecting city life for future water level rise. The zigzagging behavior of the infrastructure provides numerous possibilities of canals, lagoons, wetlands and aeration areas for the treatment of Tokyo Bay’s water and the growth of small ecosystems. Water tanks, spillways and wetlands are used for water management and for the temporarily relief of flooding that may occur around the coast.

The new market is re-envisioned as an infrastructural system that links multiple components together to form a larger strategy for the market and sites beyond. Every component is connects the wholesale area, storage and auction vertically. The outer Market (retail and shops) now spreads throughout the infrastructure like an exterior market bazaar that lets public life permeate throughout the site.

Tsukiji Market would evolve into a new manufactured landscape for the city that will combat ecological realities and offer new possibilities for productive public space.

Melissa Burgos and Pauline Vivaldi - 

Larsen Tokyo Studio Spring 2012

Unzipping the Coast - The new market is re-envisioned as an infrastructural system that links multiple components together to form a larger strategy for the market and sites beyond. Every component is connects the wholesale area, storage and auction vertically. The outer Market (retail and shops) now spreads throughout the infrastructure like an exterior market bazaar that lets public life permeate throughout the site.
MB + PV

Unzipping the Coast - The new market is re-envisioned as an infrastructural system that links multiple components together to form a larger strategy for the market and sites beyond. Every component is connects the wholesale area, storage and auction vertically. The outer Market (retail and shops) now spreads throughout the infrastructure like an exterior market bazaar that lets public life permeate throughout the site.

MB + PV

Siphon Sponge (ML studio)
[UN] zipping the Coast

About:

This blog reflects on a body of work designed by graduate and undergraduate students under the guidance of architecture professors Roger Hubeli and Julie Larsen. The studio work strives to be at the forefront of current architectural discourse (all levels, all types, all areas, all differences). The range of work is in accordance with Hubeli and Larsen's interest in pushing pedagogy and, when possible, having pedagogy push back on practice. This is the team of Studio-FYI.

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